Toilets, Racial Inequality, Elections: the common thread? Our Public Voices Fellows have opinions on them.

On Friday the Stanford Public Voices Fellowship Program met for their second convening. We’re so excited to hear about how the Stanford scholars make their expert voices public in the coming weeks, especially since they’ve already wowed us with the op-eds they’ve written since the program’s commencement.  The scholars have published four incredible opinion pieces over the past 6 weeks (and that’s not counting the ones that have already been accepted for publication but won’t make it into print for another few days). Well done Stanford!

Jenna Davis, of Stanford’s Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, took advantage of the 10th anniversary of World Toilet Day  to write an article that focused on the global sanitation crisis in her CNN.Opinion article,  The World Needs More Toilets. Her article puts a spotlight on subject of extreme importance that doesn’t get talked about enough: access to toilets and the prevention of sanitation-related illness in a global context.

Also among the Stanford Fellows who recently published is Prudence Carter, associate professor of sociology, whose piece, The Double Blinds of Racial Inequality, ran in the Boston Review yesterday. In pondering the difficulty of choosing which inequality, race or class, is more significant to us today, Prudence pointed out that the “color-muteness” of the Occupy movement doesn’t just prioritize class as an issue, it totally denies race as one.

Also deserving of hearty congratulations is Ellen Lust of the Yale Fellowship, who, upon returning from trips to Morocco and Egypt, promptly wrote two pieces on the protests currently going on in both.

One of her articles, Morocco elections aren’t a model for the Arab Spring as West claims, ran in The Christian Science Monitor. Her other article, Hope on Egypt’s hair-raising road toward democracy , can be found at CNN.Opinion.

Congrats fellows! We hope to continue to be enlightened by your insights in the weeks to come.

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